Free Dorje Gurung

12 05 2013

URGENT: FREE DORJE GURUNG

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Dorje Gurung, a chemistry teacher who has taught all over the world (Hong Kong, Norway, the USA, Azerbaijan, Malawi and Qatar) has been jailed in Qatar on charges of insulting Islam.

 

I believe that a grave injustice has been done. 

 

 

 

Because he is Nepali, some 12 year old students were making fun of him, stereotyping.

 

Among other things, the seventh graders poked fun at his appearance, calling him “Jackie Chan,” a famous Chinese actor, the Washington Post reported.

 

He asked a rhetorical question, and they reported it as a statement. Now he is in jail for insulting Islam.

 

This is a petition to free Dorje Gurung. Please sign it. Then share and get the word out.

 

SIGN THIS PETITION

 https://www.change.org/petitions/government-of-qatar-release-dorje-gurung

 

‘LIKE’ THIS FACEBOOK PAGE

http://www.facebook.com/FreeDorjeGurung?fref=ts

 

TUMBLR : FOR MORE INFORMATION, LINKS,  ACTION PLAN AND MORE

http://freedorje.tumblr.com

 

Dorge is a United World Colleges alumni and embodies the UWC ideals: respect, compassion, mutual responsibility, integrity, the celebration of difference.

I stand for and believe in the UWC values. I will not stand for injustice.

Sign the petition: for Dorje’s freedom and for justice.

 

Free Dorje Gurung  

 

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Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting…

13 03 2012

As part of Project Week, a yearly week-long excursion that forms part of our United World Colleges education, I led a trip up to the city of Dengfeng – home to the mighty Mt. Song and the world famous birthplace of kung fu, the Shaolin Temple – where we experienced a week of intensive kung fu training. Here are some photos to tell the tale of our kung fu endeavours…

Here you see kids at the Shaolin E-Po Wushu School. These students would be running around everywhere during recess, practicing their kicks and punches and just generally developing very good stamina and agility without realising it! It was amazing to see how disciplined they all were – at one point we saw a line of about 10 boys, all squatting down on and moving slowly across the school yard, carefully picking up dirt from between the floor tiles.

Our daily training schedule was quite similar to theirs, although the intensity of our sessions would probably pale in comparison. Here’s a taste of a day’s training:

At 5:30am every morning we would quickly warm up, then go out into the cold and run along the empty streets of Dengfeng. All along the way we would see other students running in perfect formation, chanting ‘1, 1, 1-2-1’ in immaculate unison while we fumbled along, each running at our own speeds. Then we would return to the training center for some stretching, kicks and agility exercise, finishing up at around 6:45am.

Our second training session would begin at 9:00am until 11:30am. Again we would warm up, jog around the mat, stretch, kick, do lots of jumps and spins, and move on to practicing our routine. Stretching is a big part of each session…as is the pain that comes along with it!

After a quick lunch and perhaps a stroll around town we begin our last training session of the day at 2:00pm till 4:30pm. This would be very similar to the 9:00am session and afterwards we would all stay behind, playing around with various jumps, flips and kicks. By 9pm most of us will be fast asleep in bed, ready to start at 5:30am the next morning all over again!

We arrived on Sunday and as there is no training, we visited the Shaolin Temple.For some of us it was the first time to see snow…

The excitement as some of us touch snow for the first time!

Up we go to visit the Dharma Cave, climbing up large concrete steps. The Mt. Song mountain range stretched before us, the Shaolin Temple slowly diminished in size below us, and the landscape became progressively more snowy. Hmm…very Zen like.

A nice warm up for the coming week of intensive training!

Bodhidharma supposedly meditated in this cave for nine years, facing a wall and not speaking for the entire time. Talk about being patient and profound!

Here you have Leila practicing a kung fu stance (pu bu) on a tree.

On the second last day of the trip, we visited the Song Yang Academy and also did a short hike up to the entrance of the Songshan National Park. Halfway up the hike there was a little house, where some villagers were burning offerings for their ancestors, while others huddled around cooking noodles for lunch. This lady gave me the glare as I tried to peep in through the doorway…She seems to be telling me, ‘Tourist, you shall not pass!’.

At the Songyang Academy, we all walked around a small pond three times. Folklore has it that doing so will get you top grades. Naturally, we all dropped our bags down and proceeded to circle the pond three times.

This is our instructor Coach Jia’s two year old son. We asked him whether he would have his son practice kung fu, and he told us that it would really be up to his son to decide whether he liked kung fu or not. It’s interesting to see a  liberal parenting mindset as this coming from our coach, who has been practicing kung fu for 20 years. A helpful reminder that not all Chinese parents are Tiger Mums or Eagle Dads!